Thanking the rocks [a toddler lesson]

Hey there,

Bodhi has gotten into this remarkable habit of thanking everything. He says “Thank you” when you give him a cup of cereal (his favorite treat EVER). He says it when you take off his mittens. He says it when he takes off his coat. He says it when he piles up toys in a corner. We’re not always sure who or what he’s thanking, but it’s always with deep sincerity (and it always makes me smile).

The other day, we were outside in the backyard. There’s about 20 trees out there, and one in particular has a sturdy trunk with one of those divets in the root where water pools and rocks have collected over the years. Bodhi has gotten in the habit of diving his little fingers into the pool of water, retrieving the rocks, piling them up on our patio, and then walking them back over to the tree.

Bodhi in the rain, playing with the rocks at the root of the tree

Bodhi in the rain, playing with the rocks at the root of the tree

I watched him do this the other day. He’s so methodical, sometimes walking over to me to say “See ‘em” to the rocks or have me hold them. On this particular day, he started to place the rocks one by one back into the tree saying “thank you” to each one as he returned them to their home. It was one of the most precious things I have ever seen. Bodhi Bear, barely a toddler, thanking the rocks, caring for them as gingerly as we would a baby. It has gotten me thinking:

When was the last time you thanked the rocks?
When was the last time you thanked the trees?
When was the last time you thanked the sun?
The moon?
The clouds?
The ocean tides?

And, to take it further…
When was the last time you thanked a friend?
A parent?
A spouse?
Your body?
Your heart?
Your spirit?

I’ve had this theory for a long time now that babies and toddlers are so wise. They are born with a higher sense of consciousness and intelligence than maybe many give credit for because they are still learning to talk, move, express. Their wonder is great. Their instincts are pure.

Bodhi showed me that day how connected we naturally are to nature. How what we see on the outside is often a reflection of what’s going on inside. He sees wonder in nature. He sees wonder in his own hands and belly and now his elbows are especially intriguing. He’s continually inspired by the outdoors and he reminds me of our natural connection to it, too.

Try spending more time outdoors and express your gratitude. As you head to a river’s edge, thank the water for the life it brings. Go outside, stand under the trees, and feel gratitude for the fresh air. Stare at the stars in the inky sky, and thank the Universe for its beauty and its mystery. As you start to feel gratitude for the natural state of wonder that’s around you, I’m betting you’ll start to feel it within, too. Thank you, Bodhi, for thanking the rocks. You teach me so much everyday.

With love,
Leanne